Tag Archives: chocolate

Food Service Industry Week In Brief: March 25th-30th

Looking for some of the week’s top information? Here are five stories from the foodservice industry for March 25th-30th.

 

Pink Slime Producer Stops Production at Three Factories

From TheDailyMeal.com, read article here

Unless you’ve been hiding underneath a rock for the past few weeks, there has been a public backlash against “pink slime.”  Many groceries have decided to stop carrying the ammonia-treated meat, in response to the thousands of Americans who have protested against the chemically-sprayed, unlabeled food.  This week another action occurred in response to the protests, as Beef Products Inc., one of the “pink slime” producers, decided to suspend manufacturing at three out of the four pink-slime producing plants.  Nine hundred thousand pounds of the meat were being produced at the plants, according to the AP, and the president of Beef Products Inc. has said that the halt in production has caused “…a loss of 3,000 jobs.”  For more information, read the full article on the Daily Meal website.

Whole Foods to Stop Selling Unsustainable Wild-Caught Seafood

From HuffingtonPost.com, read the article here

Starting April 22 (also known as Earth Day), Whole Foods will no longer carry Unsustainable Wild-Caught Seafood.  Unsustainable wild-caught seafood is defined as “red rated,” a color that is coded by the Blue Ocean Institute and the Monterey Bay Aquarium in California. MP900182711 The rating indicates that the “…seafood is either overfished or caught in a way that harms other species.”   The upcoming change will most likely result in higher prices though; in some cases, sustainable suppliers have lower yields.

Types of seafood that will no longer remain on the shelves include: octopus, gray sole, skate, Atlantic halibut and Atlantic cod caught by trawls.  The Atlantic halibut will be replaced by those found in the Pacific and cod will be caught on lines.

Whole Foods is among many supermarkets, such as Albertson’s, BJ’s Wholesale Club, and Shop ‘n Save, responding to end users concerned with where their seafood is coming from.

Greenpeace Oceans Campaign Director, John Hocevar, is pretty happy with how many supermarkets are responding to its seafood sustainability scorecard that was first established in 2008.  It’s pretty impressive to see that it was an issue that really wasn’t on most of these companies’ radar,” Hocevar said, “and with encouragement from us and many others, they really did for the most part step up.”  For more information, read the full article on the Huffington Post website.

Chipotle to Give out Free Burritos From Recycled Lunch Bags

From QSR.com, read the full article here

Between March 30th and April 14th, if customers buy a Chipotle-branded recycled lunch bag from their online store, the casual dining restaurant will give out an eco-friendly card that is redeemable on Earth Day for a free burrito, bowl, salad, or order of tacos.  All of the proceeds that come from the bag sales will be donated to the Chipotle Cultivate Foundation.

The lunch bags are made through a process called upcycling.   Using less energy than traditional recycling methods, billboards directly from Chipotle outdoor ads are made into resilient, sturdy products.  The bag features a top-roll adjustable strap closure, reinforced side seams and handle and an extra-large back pocket.  The front and back panels are the reverse side of the billboards; the side design features the front designs of different billboards, making each bag unique and one-of-a-kind.

Lunch bags are limited; customers must purchase their bag between Monday, March 26, and Saturday April 14, 2012, in order to receive it in time for Earth Day.  For more information, read the full article on the QSR website.

Eat Chocolate, Lose Weight?

From WSJ.com, read the full article here

A new study conducted by the National Institutes of Health in Southern California has found that people who consume more chocolate are thinner than those who eat less of it.chocolate

Participants in the study were asked how many times a week they ate chocolate, as well as other types of food and drink.  BMI, or body mass index, was calculated as well.

The people who ate more chocolate didn’t eat less calories or exercise more; they actually ate more calories than the non-chocolate eating participants.

But don’t go running to the nearest candy store to load up on chocolate bars; the study doesn’t prove a link between chocolate and weight loss.  Researchers say the findings only suggest the health benefits may be linked to how many times a week chocolate is eaten rather than how much is eaten in a week, says Beatrice Golomb, an associate professor at the University of California, San Diego.

“Our findings appear to add to a body of information suggesting that the composition of calories, not just the number of them, matters for determining their ultimate impact on weight,” says Dr. Golomb.

Many doctors suggest sticking to about an ounce of chocolate a day—most likely, dark chocolate, according to Lauren Graf, a nutritionist at Montefiore Medical Center, in Bronx, N.Y.  Dark chocolate has more antioxidants and less sugar than milk chocolate, so endulge just a little!  For more information, read the full article on the Wall Street Journal’s website.

Central Restaurant Products Launches Their New Facebook Timeline Page

It’s new; it’s improved–that’s right!  It’s CPR’s new Facebook Timeline page!  We’ve re-designed our Facebook page to be more streamlined, and hopefully, a little more user-friendly.  Come check us out and like our page at: www.facebook.com/centralrestaurantproducts.  By liking our page, you’ll enjoy fun facts about the food service industry, see the latest and greatest products we’re carrying, and enjoy a little laughs from our employees.  Come join in on the fun–you know you want to!

Milk; Image from MorgueFile

Living with Dietary Restrictions: Dairy Free

Milk; Image from MorgueFileThink about what you’re planning to have to eat today.  Does a dairy product make it onto the menu?  If you’re part of the 75% of the world’s population that is lactose intolerant to some extent or a lower 3% with a milk allergy, you may be giving a bit more thought to your daily dairy intake.   Read on to find the differences between an intolerance and an allergy, what is being done for sufferers and a few helpful and delicious dairy-free recipes.

What’s the difference between
lactose intolerance and a milk allergy?

Lactose intolerance is an inability to digest the milk sugar, lactose, found in dairy products.

Milk Allergies are more focused on the proteins or caseins within milk products.

What products should be avoided?

For both you should avoid dairy products such as cheese, yogurt, milk, butter, chocolate, goat’s milk products and any product labeled as containing milk or milk ingredients.

What are some alternatives?

Most dairy-based product have an alternative that uses a soy or rice base although sometimes soy may also cause allergic reactions and intolerances.

Eating Non-Dairy on the Go

While it may take a bit of pre-planning using online allergen guides, many restaurants now have tasty options for those with dairy-free eating restriction.  There is also a handy databases like Allergy Eats and Allerdine which allow you to search for restaurants in your area that have special food safety measures for patrons with food allergies.

The most important tip when eating out (other than avoiding the obvious dairy products) is to be aware of cross-contamination.   This can happen through using the same frying oil, grills, woks or cutting boards for the dairy and non-dairy foods.  Another way to prevent cross-contamination is to bring along your own wet cloth to wipe down any surfaces just in case the allergens were left from the previous diner.

It’s also imperative that you open a dialogue between yourself and the wait staff and/or management.   While you may have already looked at the allergen guides, it’s always a wise idea to double check to confirm that the item you’re ordering is cooked and prepared separately and without any allergy/intolerance inducing elements.  Making these inferences every time and at every location is important since staff, preparation guidelines, etc. may change from visit to visit.

Places like Chipotle, Qdoba and Subway are some of the more obvious options since you’re able to add exactly what you want (be sure to watch out for cross contamination).   However, there are many options at your average sit-down restaurant like Denny’s, Chili’s, Red Lobster and Outback Steakhouse as well.  In fact, Outback not only gives suggestions on menu items, they also give advice on how to request the food be cooked and what extras should be left off to ensure a higher degree of safety.

And just in case you’re planning a trip to Disney with your dairy-free eater, not to worry, there are plenty of tasty options there too including tofu ice cream, waffles with fruit and dairy free whipped topping, rice milk and dairy free pasta.

Deliciously Dairy-free recipes to try at home

Gluten Free & Dairy Free Lasagna

Chocolate Chip Cookie Muffins – Milk Free Recipes

How do you or your family members deal with lactose intolerance or a milk allergy?  Please share your story.

Article sources
1)     Dairy Free Living
2)     Kids Health
3)     Mayo Clinic
4)     National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse (NDDIC)  
5)     PubMed Health