Tag Archives: Food Safety

Food Allergies and Restaurants: It’s All About Communication

Roughly 15 million Americans have food allergies, with the top eight being: milk, eggs, peanuts, tree nuts, fish, shellfish, soy and wheat.

Most all of these items are used in restaurants on a daily basis and food allergies have become more prevalent; many restaurants have adapted to ensure the safety of customers.  But there are still restaurants that have no experience with food allergies.  According to Sloane Miller, MSW, LMSW, author and advocate (AllergicGirl.com), it’s all about communication.

All About Communication

Image from Sloane Miller, Copyright David Handshuh

When a person has a food allergy, it isn’t up to the individual to assume the kitchen staff knows how to handle it.  On the reverse, the kitchen staff must work together to ensure everyone understands what the customer’s needs are.  Miller makes a great yet obvious point:  A restaurant’s goal is never to hurt anyone; it just takes some negotiation and conversation to get on the same page.

“As a diner with food allergies, I want what every diner wants—to fall in love with a restaurant.  I want to taste a chef’s special dishes,” she said.

“My relationship with a chef or restaurant or chain can last for years.  I’ve created many relationships and have many restaurants I visit a few times a week.  I’m a regular with just a few special food allergy needs.”

 

Is Your Restaurant Capable?

Not every restaurant can accommodate a person with a food allergy—and that’s okay.  Miller mentioned there are some restaurants that put customers first, and then there are others where a chef and their creation is the focus.

Now, for those restaurants with little to no experience with food allergies but who want to become an accommodating establishment, there are ways to become educated and set procedures.  Many resources are available, such as “Welcoming Guests with Food Allergies” by the Food Allergy & Anaphylaxis Network.

To Dos for Those with Allergies

While dining at a restaurant requires work from both the diner and the restaurant, the diner has to be prepared beforehand.

“It starts with the patient understanding their food allergy, what they can and can’t have, carrying their emergency medications and having their own emergency plan of action,” Miller said. “Then they can engage a restaurant, group or chain in the process of dialogue. ‘These are my needs; does the chef feel comfortable with my needs?’ Ask via phone or email before stepping into a restaurant. It gives everyone, the diner and the restaurant, the chance to make an informed decision.”

Miller added that upon dining out, she makes the dining experience pleasant for the restaurant, smiles a lot and develops many new relationships.

“I love dining out, I love chefs, I love food and I love tipping well.  These are things I recommend to my clients. If a restaurant is able to meet your needs, please tip well (like 20 percent on the bill) and return so staff get to know you, your needs.”

To Dos for Restaurants

“Accommodating. Communication.”

These are words Miller used frequently when she described her relationships with restaurants.  After all, despite having special food needs, she brings in money—whether it’s bringing in a group for a business meeting or a birthday party.  Developing a relationship with a diner can really become profitable, whether they have a food allergy or not.

“We are their best undiscovered asset,” she described about being a diner.

However, if a person with food allergies comes to your restaurant and you don’t feel your kitchen can fully meet their needs—it’s okay to say no.  It’s important for the person’s well-being.

Working with the customer is important and must be taken seriously.  If they ask for a manager or have their order sent back, it’s not because they don’t like it and is nothing to be offended by.  A tiny part of a peanut or something that has been cross-contaminated can be a life or death situation.

Common Misconceptions and Breakdown of Communication

Miller finds the most common misconception about food allergies is “a little bit won’t hurt.”  With a food allergy, “a little bit” can be fatal.  (Read about symptoms and reactions in our blog: The New Bully in our Schools—Food Allergies).

As a person with food allergies, Miller said if there has ever been an issue dining out, it’s when there has been a breakdown of communication.  This breakdown happens between the back of the house and the front of the house, back to the table.

“About every tenth time I dine out, someone in the back of the house doesn’t get the message and misses,” she explained.  “Even when I triple check, communication can still break down and end up in a food allergy error, which is why I advocate that everyone always have their emergency mediation on them at all times and have an emergency action plan as well.”

Restaurant In Action

One of Indiana’s most beloved restaurants is Scotty’s Brewhouse, with five (soon to be six) locations around the state.  They are a prime example of an establishment well-educated in handling food for those with food allergies.

“First off, we start with training employees how to handle allergies when an order comes back,” said Luke Duncan, director of kitchen operations for Scotty’s Brewhouse Inc.  “The cooks related to the items take off their gloves and wash their hands.  We have separate utensils, cooking pans and cutting boards we use for all allergy items.  Also, especially for gluten-free items, we take ingredients out of the back from fresh batches and not what we have on our cook line to avoid cross-contamination.”

Also, each location has a guide of products readily available for managers to reference to if they are uncertain about hidden allergies, such as an item that doesn’t include peanuts, but was processed at a plant that processes nuts.

“We make every effort for an allergen plate to be handled by the cook (who cooked it from beginning to end without interruption whenever possible) and the manager on duty only, this way we do not introduce contamination from a third party not thinking about what they’re doing,” Duncan added.  “The manager finishes the plate with two American flag toothpicks (one on each end of the plate) to ensure any food runners to not grab the plate by mistake.  We have managers run the food whenever possible or a specific delegate if they are tied up elsewhere.”

Duncan said a diner who comes in with a food allergy is a challenging scenario when they are busy.  However, Scotty’s instructs servers to inform guests it may take a few extra minutes to ensure their order is properly handled.  And for a safe and enjoyable meal, that customer sure won’t mind.

Recap for Diners

  • Fully understand your allergy/allergies
  • Carry emergency medications
  • Have a personal emergency plan of action
  • Engage with a restaurant by calling or emailing ahead of time and discussing needs
  • Be pleasant, tip well and return upon having a good experience so the staff get to know you

Recap for Restaurants

  • Set procedures in place for food allergies and train all employees
  • Talk with the customer to ensure your kitchen can meet their needs
  • Don’t be afraid to say no if you don’t think your restaurant is capable
  • Ensure full communication with all staff members, both front and back of the house
  • Don’t be offended when asked to speak to a manager or have a dish sent back

10 Tips for Food Safety

Is your foodservice establishment following safe food handling practices?  Whether you’re a restaurant or school cafeteria, food safety should always be a top priority.  Over time (especially during peak meal times), employees may become lackadaisical to food safety.  Be sure to remind them how important it is and use these tips to ensure your establishment is safe for your customers.

1. Thoroughly cook food. 

Under-cooking food runs the risk of making your customers ill in a variety of ways from food poisoning to E.Coli.  Use a thermometer to ensure foods are cooked thoroughly and maintain a safe temperature if left out.  Food Safe Schools put together this PDF which gives a reference on control time and temperature.

2. Avoid cross contamination.

From our Cross Contamination Prevention Guide, did you know cross contamination is the sixth largest contributing factor to food borne illness?  Avoid cross contamination and make it easier for restaurant workers by using a color coded system. There is a commonly used color scheme used for cutting boards, knives and gloves. Read more in our Cross Contamination Prevention Guide.

 

3. Wash hands and change gloves frequently.

There are times when it’s okay to be conservative to save money, but when it comes to food safety, it’s never okay to put anyone at risk for the sake of saving a few dollars. Employees must wash hands and change gloves frequently, especially between tasks and upon exiting/entering the kitchen.  To put the importance into perspective, review Foodbeast’s “Handwashing Awareness & Helpful Tips” infographic.

4. Stick by the two hour rule.

If food has been sitting out at room temperature for two or more hours, get rid of it.

5. Accommodate guests with food allergies.

Food allergies are serious and create a variety of reactions from discomfort to anaphylactic shock.  Note on menus or menu cards if items contain or are around certain foods.  Also, post signage and put in menus a request for customers with allergies to inform the wait staff.  In return, employees must understand the seriousness of food allergies and convey the information to the kitchen.  Some of the top food allergies are peanuts, tree nuts, sesame, fish, shellfish, dairy, eggs, soy, gluten and wheat. 

6. Have a Certified Food Protection Manager (CFPM). 

iPura covers this in their blog “FDA Retail Food Safety Initiative—Focus on Protection,” which is a FDA initiative that will become more well known as time moves on.  Establishments with a CFPM are more compliant with regulations and have less risk factors.  Straight from their action plan, the duties of a CFPM are to make their presence a common practice, strengthen active managerial control at retail to ensure better compliance, encourage widespread, uniform and complete adoption of the FDA Food Code and to create an enhanced local regulatory environment for retail food operations.

7. Utilize food rotation labels.

Food labels  help employees know which foods are fresh, which foods need to be used quickly and which foods are no longer good for use and need to be discarded.  Ecolab has put together an entire page dedicated to food rotation which includes their “First In, First Out” method to ensure food is served fresh and is safe.

8. Be familiar with your food supplier. 

Smart Blog on Restaurants covers this in their blog, “Food Safety Checklist for Restaurants.”  By knowing your food distributor and using a trusted one, you can work with them to ensure food is safe and of the best quality.  SmartBlog also has this reminder, which is similar to what we said earlier about never sacrificing food safety to save some money: “Be wary of suppliers that are guided solely by price; food safety as a cost, but it’s worth the investment.”

9. Wash foods properly.

Photo by Maxstraeten on MorgueFile.com

That being said, kitchens should also know which foods aren’t recommended for washing.  There are quite a few specifics when it comes to proper food washing and the USDA has put together this “Safe Food Handling” guide on their website to help with proper food washing methods.

 


10. Create a plan and stick to it.

Make sure you have safe food handling practices and your employees follow them.  It’s a serious matter.  Employees must know safe food handling practices are one of the most important aspects to their job and everyone needs to comply.

How does your foodservice establishment handle food safety? What are some methods that have been successful?

10 Back to School Products and Ideas for School Cafeterias

The beginning of the school year is the best time to go over standards and policies.  It’s also the time to make sure all the right tools are available to make every day a successful one.

Here are 10 products and ideas from Central to help get your cafeteria started right for the upcoming school year.

1. Food safety is critical.  All cafeteria employees should go over proper food and hand washing techniques at the beginning of the year, followed by periodic refresher meetings and posted signage.  Also, when wearing gloves, upon stepping away from a workstation, or moving on to another task (even if just for a second), dispose of the gloves immediately and put on a new pair when returning.

2. There are trays designed for a quick turnaround.  Melamine compartment trays dry the quickest and are an excellent choice for schools with a quick turnaround. Click on any of the following for more information: #17K-046, #17K-047, #17K-051 and #17K-052.

3. Planning menus in advance, and making them easy to access, helps everyone.  Can students and parents easily access your menus?  If they are only sent home with students, don’t forget about the ones who lose things easily or forget to take things home. Consider posting menus online and also having menu boards in the cafeteria. This way, everyone stays informed.

4. Cold food/salad bars are a great way to make fruits and vegetables available for children and promote healthy eating habits.  These types of food bars are really making their way into schools.  Even one of Michelle Obama’s initiatives of “Let’s Move!” includes the campaign for “Let’s Move Salad Bars to Schools.”  The Carlisle Six-Star food bar or Cambro Versa Bars are great choices that come in a youth height for easy access.

5. Create a rewards program to help teach students healthy eating habits.  Make sure the program doesn’t reward with more food—especially junk food.  Work with other members of the school to create incentives to eat healthier such as free time or fun activities.

6. Learning doesn’t have to stop during lunch time.  On top of promoting healthy eating habits, use meal times to inform students of your school’s green initiatives and get them involved. This can set them up to be environmentally conscious in their every day life.

7. Food allergies are very serious.  All workers should be prepared in the event of an emergency, even if you don’t have any students to your knowledge with allergies.  A student’s life can depend on it. In last week’s resources blog, we found excellent information about food allergies from the Food Allergy & Anaphylaxis Network, including this Food Action Plan.

8. When shopping, there are warranties exclusive to schools.  Keep your eye out for these. Some brands that have these special warranties are Garland, Vulcan, APW Wyott, Cres Cor, Duke and Univex. (At Central, we mention ours in our school catalogs. Feel free to contact a Product Consultant for help).

9. Keep cereal fresh.  For breakfast programs, cereal dispensers keep food fresh, save space and control portion sizes.

10. Dispose of the disposables. For flatware, both the Windsor and Dominion medium weights are great options for schools as well as our Central Exclusive Tumblers. Also, while you may not always think of ice as a disposable, have you ever considered reusable ice? It saves money and you will never have to deal with the mess regular ice can bring. Check out mat #647-001 or singles #647-002.  And if you’re in the market for a new dishwasher, the Jackson CREW44 conveyor dishwasher is one of the top picks for schools.

Don’t forget to check out last week’s resources blog to keep informed going into the school year. Also, check out our February blog “Top 10 Ways Central Can Help Your Cafeteria Go Green” if you’re looking to make your school cafeteria more eco-friendly.  Don’t forget to share your favorite products and ideas below.

Thanks to Central’s Category Managers Laura Bedillion and Elizabeth Price for providing great product suggestions.

School’s Back in Session! Top Five Resources for Your School Cafeteria

It’s August and many students are headed back to the classroom which means they’re heading back to your cafeteria. Now, more than ever, schools across the country are re-evaluating menus and updating standards to make students healthier and to promote food safety. Here are five great resources to get your cafeteria on the right track, or to help you improve current procedures.

Image from Let’s Move! website

Let’s Move!

What it’s about: First Lady Michelle Obama’s initiative to help raise a healthier generation of children.

How it can help your school: They provide guidance for everyone in the school from the principal to foodservice staff. Let’s Move! has brought on changes and updated standards to the National School Lunch and National School Breakfast programs and have also launched other initiatives such as Chefs Move to Schools and HealthierUS School Challenge

Important links:

Let’s Move! Healthy Schools

Chefs Move to Schools

The HealthierUS School Challenge

Five Simple Steps to Success

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Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Network (FAAN)

What it’s about: FAAN is a credible and trusted source of information, programs and resources for food allergies and anaphylaxis. Their mission is “to raise public awareness, to provide advocacy and education, and to advance research on behalf of those affected by food allergies and anaphylaxis.”

How it can help your school: They assist schools in food allergy training and protocol.  They also provide detailed information about the different types of food allergies.

Important links:

Safe at School Resources for Schools, Camps and Child Care Centers

Education for School Professionals

School Guidelines for Managing Students with Food Allergies

Food Allergy Action Plan

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National Coalition for Food-Safe Schools (NCFSS)

What it’s about: They improve food safety in America’s schools.

How it can help your school: NCFSS provides information specifically for foodservice staff on safely handling food.

Important links:

Food Safety for Foodservice Professionals

Action Guide—Materials for Each Team Member

Responding to a Food Recall

Food Safety Checklist (Word)

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School Nutrition Association (SNA)

What it’s about: SNA provides high-quality, low-cost meals to students and have been “advancing the availability, quality and acceptance of school nutrition programs as an integral part of education since 1946.”

How it can help your school: For one, if you aren’t already a member, you may want to consider becoming one (click here for information).  SNA has some information available to the public on their website, but membership includes extensive education and training.  SNA sets standards through certification and credentials, gathers and shares several kinds of important school nutrition news, legislation, etc., and represents the nutritional interests of all children.

Important links:

Resource Center

Preparing School Meals

Menu Planning

Teaching Kids About Nutrition

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Other Initiatives

What it’s about: The government and other programs have updated standards and have released new information about nutrition in schools.

How it can help your school: These resources will keep your cafeteria current with the latest initiatives and standards and/or will give you ideas for improvement.

Important links:

MyPlate

Cafeteria Composting Plan

World Health Organization (WHO) Global School Health Initiative

USDA School Meals

Food Safety: How to Stay E. coli Free

In recent months E. coli has been a hot topic of conversation due to recent outbreaks in Germany, many other parts of Europe and even a few cases here in the U.S.  The cause of this potentially deathly affliction?  Overall the answer has been something as small and simple as contaminated sprout seeds from Egypt according to the International Business Times.   While these latest occurrences have brought the infection back to the top of everyone’s minds, it’s imperative for every restaurant to know the background on it and more importantly how it can most often be prevented.

hamburgers, image from morguefileWhat is E. coli and who does it affect?

Commonly known as E. coli, the technical name for the bacteria is Escherichia coli.   On a day to day basis, a certain strain of the bacteria is already inside your stomach to help you digest food.  However, there is another strain of the germ, usually found in raw/undercooked meat, that when ingested can cause the severe illness we usually associate with the bacteria.

While E. coli can affect anyone, it is most aggressive in children and the elderly.  This is mostly due to a weaker immune system along with a larger opportunity for these two groups to be in close proximity (schools, day cares and nursing homes) with others who may pass along the germ.

How can E. coli be prevented?

There are several ways to help prevent E. coli from spreading.  Here are just a few tips compiled from familydoctor.org, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and ecolifoodpoisoning.net.

  • Wash fruits and vegetables thoroughly.   This makes sure to remove any dirt or fertilizer that the produce has been grown in.  The closer the item is grown to the ground (i.e. lettuce, cabbage, sprouts) the more likely it is to have been affected.
  • Make sure to avoid cross-contamination.   Always use separate knives and cutting boards for raw meat and other items when preparing them.  It’s also important to use separate plates for raw and cooked meat.
  • Ensure that all meat is cooked to the appropriate/suggested temperature.  In terms of E. coli, this is especially important with red meat.  Here’s a great guide to knowing what the right temperature for each meat is.
  • Do not drink unpasteurized milk and juice.
  • Last but not least, make sure you always wash your hands and keep all surfaces wiped down.  While this may be a no-brainer after a trip to the restroom or after taking out the trash, it’s also extremely important after touching meat or other products that could possibly be a contamination issue.

washing hands, image from morguefileIs it possible to permanently get rid of the threat of E. coli?

As the answer to many future dining nightmares, this could happen (to some extent) in the future.  The Huffington Post reports that by using irradiation on food, eating could be a much safer endeavor.  The article continues by saying, “Irradiation zaps food with electron beams, like the kind long used to run TVs, or with gamma rays or X-rays. It’s the same way numerous medical products are sterilized.”  However, because many consumers have a fear of this method, this process continues to be the exception with foods requiring labels when the process is used.

What methods do you and/or your restaurant use to prevent the spread of E. coli?  How have you handled scares and/or outbreaks in the past?  Please leave your comments below.

Image from MorgueFile

Living with Dietary Restrictions: Gluten-Free

Image from MorgueFileHave you had a sandwich this week for lunch?  If so, it was probably some type of meat and/or veggies inside a nice thick bun or maybe some delicious doughy bread.  Imagine that same sandwich, only take away the bun or bread and you’d be more accurately describing a meal fit for someone who is gluten-free.  Whether you’re gluten-free by choice or necessity, it can put a crimp in your daily diet, but it’s important to know that it doesn’t mean having to do without. Celiac.com says that “at least 1 in 133 Americans” are affected by Celiac Disease.  Wheat allergies are in the top 8 most common food allergies alongside items like peanuts and shellfish.  There are many more suffering with gluten sensitivities.  With this in mind, much of the food industry has begun to turn over a new leaf and started to offer a much broader range of foods and knowledge to ensure safety and variety for those on a gluten-free diet.

What’s the difference between celiac disease, gluten sensitivity and wheat allergies?

“People with celiac disease who eat foods containing gluten experience an immune reaction in their small intestines, causing damage to the inner surface of the small intestine and an inability to absorb certain nutrients,” is the way Celiac Disease is described by the Mayo Clinic.  While this disease is manageable, if not carefully monitored and properly diagnosed, it could eventually lead to permanent damage to the intestines.  Since this disease is genetic, the American Celiac Disease Alliance encourages, “If someone in your family is diagnosed, it is recommended that first degree relatives (parents, children, siblings) are screened as well. “

Gluten sensitivity, while still painful, poses no long-term physical damage.  Basically, it is an intolerance of the body to digest gluten and while it can cause discomfort in the form of abdominal pain and similar issues, it will not cause any permanent damage and will go away once the gluten is out of the system.

Wheat allergies are more directly associated with a protein found in wheat products, which means it could be possible for sufferers to eat other types of grains.  Like many other allergies the symptoms can range anywhere from mild (an upset stomach) to severe (throat swelling, lowered blood pressure, etc.)

What products should be avoided?

For all three issues you should avoid products containing wheat, rye and barley which includes many types of bread, crackers, pastas, pizza and cookies.   It’s also extremely important to always read food labels to make sure other products don’t contain these ingredients.  According to the Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Network (FAAN), “Wheat has been found in some brands of ice cream, marinara sauce, play dough, potato chips, rice cakes, and turkey patties, and at least one brand of hot dogs.”

What are some alternatives?

Recently, more and more items have become gluten-free.  There are now breads, cereals, pizzas and other products certified by the FDA as gluten free.  Two such brands that you may find in your local grocery store are Udi’s which specializes in baked goods and Amy’s which offers everything from frozen pastas to soups (with an extra bonus that all products are either organic or made with organic ingredients).  FAAN also gives the suggestion of using items like rice, corn or potato starch flour when baking as a substitute for wheat flour.                       

Eating Gluten-free on the Go

Although it does take some extra planning, eating gluten-free at your favorite restaurant is a possibility.  As mentioned in our post on dairy-free dining, there are many databases like Allergy Eats and Allerdine which allow you to search for restaurants in your area that take special food safety measures for patrons with food allergies.  There’s also a database specifically for gluten-free eating, Gluten-free-onthego.com, that allows you to search for everything from coffee shops to sit-down restaurants all over the world (recently France, Italy, Spain and Mallorca were added to the search areas).  And in case you’re at the grocery and want to know what’s safe to grab, there are also several apps to get your phone thinking gluten-free such as Gluten Free (for Blackberry) and Gluten Free Ingredients (for Android).

Just as in our previous dairy-free post, it’s extremely important to be aware of the possibility of cross-contamination when eating gluten-free.  The easiest way to do this is simply by keeping an open dialogue between yourself and the wait staff and/or management.  Doing this will give you the ability to ask questions and make an informed decision on whether or not an establishment truly does meet the standards for being gluten-free.  In addition to your own guidelines, an advocacy group for the gluten-free community called Celiebo, has presented a certification program to make sure restaurants are as safe as possible for diners.  In an article from Food Service Central, it says that “The Celiebo certification includes training programs, presentations and educational materials to be posted in kitchens detailing the specifics of gluten-free food preparation and ingredients to avoid. Certified establishments will also receive a window decal that states they are a Celiebo Certified Gluten-Free Restaurant™.”  And while this certification is currently only being used in New York City, it plans to eventually expand.

In the meantime, if you’re on the go and curious as to where it’s safe to eat, you can rest assured that there are many options.  Chains like Cheeseburger in Paradise, Bonefish Grill, and Outback Steakhouse (also Dairy-free friendly) all have a variety of options to keep you safe while letting you enjoy a wide selection.  However, restaurants are not your only gluten-free on-the-go dining option.  If you like sports, you’ll be happy to know that many baseball and football concession stands are also joining in on this dining revolution.  Triumph Dining has some great coverage on dining safe while watching your favorite team including what’s offered at some individual stadiums like Tropicana Field and Busch Stadium.


Delicious Gluten-free recipes to try at home

“Lighter than Air” Chocolate Cake

Zucchini Muffins 

How do you or your family members deal with being gluten free?  Please share your story. 

Expert Solutions in Food Safety

Whether you are looking for food safety solutions or are browsing through for information, food safety is important for every restaurant.  Here are four solutions from our Product Consultants to help improve food safety. For questions or more information, contact us toll free at (800) 222-5107. Extensions for each product consultant are listed below.

 

Color Cutting Boards

Reduce the risk of cross contamination, eliminate confusion and speed up food preparation time by using color-coded cutting boards. Because these boards come in six different colors, you can assign a separate color to each food group (fish, cooked foods, fruits/vegetables, poultry, meat or general use).

Food Rotation Labels

One simple way to ensure food safety in the kitchen is to use food rotation labels. The labels come in a variety of options, including pre-printed day of the week, blank labels, color-coded and dissolvable. The labels will not fall off of storage containers like masking tape, are easy to read at a quick glance and are FDA-approved for indirect food contact.

Thermometers

Keep prepared foods out of danger zone! Use a thermometer with a timer to safely monitor the cooling process of your food. Bacteria rapidly multiplies in foods that have been in the danger zone (+40°F to +140°F) for more than two hours.

Knee-Operated Hand Sink

Did you know that germs and bacteria can live on stainless steel for up to 48 hours? Even after thoroughly washing your hands, you could pick those germs up again just by turning off the water. The touch-free design of knee-operated sinks help you to significantly reduce the risk of re-contaminating your hands.

New white paper: Running a restaurant

The response to our new white paper on running a restaurant has been tremendous!

We tried to cover the major aspects of the restaurant business from opening to advertising. For instance, the Small Business Administration provided information about loan programs, and even helps first-timers develop a business plan in order to apply for financing.

The (free) paper also includes information about choosing a location, buying equipment, designing the kitchen and dining room and some of the major current issues surrounding the restaurant.

Much of the information came from our product consultants. Many of them are Certified Foodservice Professionals (CFSP); the major accreditation for the foodservice industry.

I also used the CFSP study guide, published by NAFEM, and several other food-industry trade journals.

The white paper is available on our website, CentralRestaurant.com — we would love to hear your thoughts!