Tag Archives: On the Border

Dining Out to Raise Funds for Breast Cancer Awareness Month

October marks the 27th annual National Breast Cancer Awareness Month.   The point of dedicating an entire month to the cause is to educate people on the importance of things like early detection, possible causes and treatments as well as recognize those who have been touched by it.   According to the Susan G. Komen for the Cure site it was estimated that in 2011 alone there will be about 230,480 new cases of invasive breast cancer and 57,650 new cases of in situ breast cancer in women and about 2,140 new cases of breast cancer in men in the United States alone.

Because of these facts, October has also become a huge month to raise funds for finding a cure for breast cancer with a plethora of events and fundraisers to fit just about anyone’s lifestyle.   While most people might think of participating in the Race for the Cure or even wearing pink to raise awareness and funds, there are also several ways to help the cause while stimulating the economy and experiencing a delicious meal.   All over the country, restaurants are lending a hand in the fight to find a cure for breast cancer.  Whether you live in a big city where several restaurants have joined together for the cause or you’d rather help out at your favorite chain we’ve gathered several ways for you to participate in raising funds to fight back and raise awareness.

Cities Helping the Cause

Washington, D.C.
In the nation’s capital, some of the hottest restaurants have
pledged to Take a Bite Out of Breast Cancer.  According to
campaign’s site, “For one day, a week, or the entire month, participating restaurants generously donate a portion of their food and beverage sales so that we can continue our work to save lives.”   There is also another layer to this fundraising campaign which involves local D.C. food bloggers and food writers.  These writing Ambassadors are each adopting a participating restaurant to encourage loyal readers to go to the restaurant they are sponsoring.

New Orleans
Restaurants in New Orleans are carrying the trend of the number 31 (the number of days in National Breast Cancer Awareness Month) throughout their campaign.   The NOLA Goes Pink campaign site describes it as, “With 31 days in the month, 31 participating New Orleans restaurants will be offering $31 prix fixe dinners or entrées in support of breast cancer awareness throughout October.”  During the campaign all participating chefs are even going a step further and wearing pink chefs’ coats and
ensuring that the foods on the prix fixe menus are “clean, healthy, non-cancer-
causing, nutrient-dense, plant-based and lean-in-animal-fat offerings.”   Not only will this fundraiser be very pink and very health-minded, it will also donate ten percent of sales at each restaurant to Susan G. Komen for the Cure.

Chicago
Several eateries in the windy city have also teamed up to collect a minimum of $1 per check (or more if the patron desires) for the Lynn Sage Foundation’s Chicago’s In Good Taste campaign.   A list of participating restaurants is listed on the Lynn Sage Foundation site and reservations for many locations can be booked through the reservation site Open Table.   According to the description on the Open Table site for the campaign, “100% of all proceeds will go directly to breast cancer research at Northwestern University.”

National Chains Helping the Cause

On the Border
At On the Border, they’ve created a Fiesta for the Cure and committed to donate a minimum of $250,000 over the course of the year to Susan G. Komen for the Cure.   The most basic way the restaurant is raising money is to encourage visitors to add a donation to their check.  As a thank you for this donation, diners are given a scratch off card which could reveal free items from On the Border as well as breast health facts.    Another food donation event at On the Border is the Give Back Night.  This designated night (check with your local restaurant for dates) means On the Border will donate 10% of all sales that night to the Komen foundation when customers present a Give Back Night flyer.  Along with these different edible options, there is also the chance to purchase merchandise like Fiesta for the Cure bracelets ($7 with $4 going to Komen) and caps ($12 with $6 going to Komen)

McAlister’s Deli
Building on customer’s love of McAlister’s Famous Sweet Tea™ and unsweet tea, McAlister’s is partnering with Susan G. Komen for the Cure for the Drink for Pink program.  All month, McAlister’s will donate $1 of each Gallon to Go of their tea sold to the foundation.   McAlister’s is dedicated to donating a minimum of $100,000 in addition to sponsoring various Race for the Cure events.

Jersey Mike’s Subs
Back in May, Jersey Mike’s Subs launched the Mike’s Way to a Cure ® six-month long multi-phase fundraiser.   The first phase was an introduction of a special “Pink Ribbon Combo” as well as a branded plastic cup for fountain drinks with 70 cents of each drink going to Susan G. Komen for the Cure and.   The second phase provided the opportunity for customers to purchase a Mike’s Way to a Cure ® t- shirt with all proceeds going to Komen.  During this time they also began using special pink paper to wrap subs and pink to go bags to raise even more awareness.   Finally, in the third phase taking place this month, all of the previous items continue to be available and many Jersey Mike’s employees are also participating in Race for the Cure® events.

While the options above are a great way to get involved with both raising awareness and funds for National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, there are many more opportunities to help no matter where you’re from or what you’re interested in.  Check out the Susan G. Komen site or your local chapter for more ways that you or your restaurant can get involved.

Eggs

Living with Dietary Restrictions: Eggs

When it comes to dietary allergies, eggs may be one of the most restrictive.   There are so many items that obviously contain eggs like most desserts/baked goods and noodles, but there are just as many, if not more foods that use eggs in a more veiled way.   Luckily, while eggs are harder to avoid than other food allergens, it does occur a little less often.  According to The Food Allergy & Anaphylaxis Network, “Egg allergy is estimated to affect approximately 1.5% of young children.”  The good news is that on average it is an allergy that can and will be outgrown.  However, it’s still smart to know what to avoid and the risks that an egg allergy presents.

EggsHow do egg allergies develop and can they be prevented?

Like most allergies, egg allergies are the body’s immune system attacking an element that it thinks is invading, in this case the egg protein.  According to the Mayo Clinic these attacks can manifest in symptoms including: Skin inflammation (most common), asthma, nasal inflammation, stomach issues and in severe cases anaphylaxis.  The reason for this allergy can range from a family history of the allergy and most often the immaturity of the digestive system, which is why the allergy shows up in children, but can be outgrown.  The Mayo Clinic continues to say those that suffer from this particular allergy are also more likely to suffer from other health problems as well.  These problems include other food allergies, hay fever, atopic dermatitis and allergic asthma.

As said before, many children do outgrow the allergy as their digestive system develops.  Kids Health says that an, “Egg allergy usually first appears when kids are very young, and most kids outgrow it by the time they’re 5 years old.”  However, it’s important to know that this is not always the case.   Allergic Child reported on a recent research study done on this topic at Johns Hopkins Children’s Center.   According to the study, “In what are believed to be the largest studies to date of children with milk and egg allergies, researchers followed more than 800 patients with milk allergy and nearly 900 with egg allergy over 13 years, finding that, contrary to popular belief, most of these allergies persist well into the school years and beyond.”

There has also been work done to help to actually prevent the allergy from appearing in the first place.  The study presented in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, suggested introducing eggs to a baby’s diet between the ages of four to six months.  While it’s not conclusive whether or not it actually prevents the allergy, it has been found that it at least does not increase its development.

What should be avoided?

With every food allergy, it’s essential to be aware of what a dish or product contains by reading labels and asking questions.  With eggs it’s also imperative to know the names of items that are egg related yet are not just simply called eggs.  The Mayo Clinic list these terms as the following: Albumin, Globulin, Lecithin, Livetin, Lysozyme, Simplesse, Vitellin, and words starting with “ova” or “ovo,” such as ovalbumin or ovoglobulin.  It’s also a good rule of thumb to avoid certain foods in general, unless they are specifically noted as not containing eggs.  Some of these items are anything made with a mix or batter, mayonnaise and items that include this ingredient, marshmallows, salad dressings and most baked goods and pastries.   It’s also wise to avoid drinks like beer, lattes and cappuccinos that use eggs in foaming agents, anything glazed and even many shampoos which use egg proteins for strengthening.  A final item that might not be as obvious is the vaccine for the flu.  The reason behind this according to the Center for Disease Control is that the vaccines are grown on egg embryos, which means they’ve been mixed with proteins from the egg itself.  However, with this item it’s important to talk with your health service provider before making a decision as they will be able to tell you if your allergy is or isn’t severe enough to cause a reaction to the small amount of protein.

Egg alternatives and eating on the go

While there are some specific alternatives to cooking with eggs like Egg Replacer by Ener-G, there are also many items that you may currently have in your house that can be used in place of eggs as well.  PETA provides many detailed options on how and what to use to substitute for egg use.  Similarly, you can try these great options compiled by Calorie Lab:

1 gelatin packet, 2 tbsp. warm water
1 tsp. baking powder, 1 tbsp. vinegar, 1 tbsp. liquid (such as water)
1 tsp. baking powder, 1 1/2 tbsp. oil, 1 1/2 tbsp. water
1 tsp. yeast, 1/4 cup warm water
1/2 of a medium-sized mashed banana
1 tbsp. ground flaxseed and 3 tbsp. warm water
1/4 cup applesauce
1 tsp. xanthan gum
In place of an egg wash, use melted margarine.
*Note:  It is important to know that these alternatives may not turn out well when a recipe calls for more than three eggs though.

When eating out with food allergies of any kind, Eating With Food Allergies advises that it’s helpful to either eat earlier or later than the normal crowds (i.e. before 6 PM or after 9 PM).   Doing so will help in allowing you to get more attentive service both at the table and in the kitchen.  Another handy item to remember when venturing out to eat is a Kids Health great cutout for your wallet that lists different foods and ingredients to avoid.  In addition to this cutout, checking sites like Special Gourmets can assist you in making decisions on the most appropriate place to eat.  The search engine bills itself as, “The largest global guide to restaurants, shops & hotels with options for gluten-free, dairy-free & other allergen-free diets.”   Not only is this guide helpful when looking for new places to try or when out of town, but it’s also handy when your or others you’re with are allergic to more than one item since it allows you to check off multiple items for your search.

While you’re out, the most reliable dining option would be to find a specifically Vegan venue.  These restaurants are always a great option for those with egg allergies because Vegans do not eat products that come from animals like eggs and the food is unlikely to suffer from cross-contamination as well.  Unfortunately, Vegan based dining options can be few and far between.  If you’re on the go and looking for an often occurring fast option, check out Taco Bell and Dairy Queen.  Taco Bell is a helpful option because most items do not contain egg products and since most items that do contain them are not necessarily created on-site, the risk for cross-contamination is lowered a bit.  As for Dairy Queen, there are some great options for you to get your ice cream fix.  However, even on their website they do warn of cross-contamination possibilities and encourage getting an ingredient listing from that specific restaurant for extra safety.   For a sit-down experience, On the Border provides a viable egg free option.  Most items there can be enjoyed normally since most of them don’t use eggs, but often require requesting the item without sauce and/or sour cream.

Delicious egg free recipes to try at home

Oven Baked Eggless Zucchini Fries from Eggless Cooking

Sweet Potato Biscuits from The Sensitive Pantry

How do you or your family members deal with being Egg Free?  Please share your story. 

Living with Dietary Restrictions: Shellfish and Fish

Shellfish and fish allergies are two of the most prevalent of the top food allergies.   These food items account for over half of all food allergies in the United States.  According to AllergicChild.com, “Approximately 12 million Americans suffer from food allergy, with 6.9 million allergic to fish and/or shellfish.”  However unlike many other food allergens, overall shellfish and fish are easier to stay away from  since with the exception of some food, vitamin and cosmetic items, their inclusion in most recipes is fairly obvious.

Photo from 1.bp.blogspot.com

       What’s the difference between shellfish and fish allergies?

Shellfish are overall pretty basic as they are divided into two different groups, mollusks and crustaceans.  Crustaceans include items like crabs, lobster, crayfish, shrimp and prawn, while mollusks include sub-categories such as Bivalves (clams, mussels, oysters and scallops), Gastropods (limpets, periwinkles, snails (escargot) and abalone) and Cephalopods (squid, cuttlefish and octopus).  The Mayo Clinic advises that “Some people are allergic to only one type of shellfish, but can eat others.”  This means it’s important to always ask a physician before eating any shellfish to be positive of which types must be avoided and which might be edible.  The Clinic continues by saying, “You’re at increased risk of developing a shellfish allergy if allergies of any type are common in your family.”

Fish allergies in contrast are much more varied compared to many other types of food allergies.  Since there are so many different types of fish, it’s hard to know exactly what to avoid.   Reactions can be caused by anything from scaly or bony fish to an entire family/species of fish.  Because the proteins in most fish are similar it’s a good idea to avoid all fish products to be safe and avoid an allergic reaction. 

Photo from talkallergy.com

                                     What should be avoided?

Even though it may seem pretty obvious to avoid items like crab, shrimp, lobster, cod, salmon and other types of shellfish and fish it’s also highly important to know about all of the items that contain these allergens.  While you may not realize it there are fish products lurking in many different types of sauces and food toppings.  AllergicChild.com lists many of these items and what they contain: Caesar salad dressing (anchovies), Worcestershire sauce (anchovies), Caponata (anchovies), fish sauce (shellfish/fish) and Patum Peperium or Gentelman’s Relish (anchovies).   The Food Allergy & Anaphylaxis Network also reminds to be on the lookout for ingredients in Barbecue sauce which often contains Worcestershire sauce.   It’s also important to be careful when eating foods like gumbo, paella and many different types of Asian cuisine which can often contain shellfish and/or fish.  

Some everyday products even use Menhaden (a type of fish) such as vitamins, soap, cosmetics and insect spray.  AllergicChild.com also warns of the use of a new type of bandage being used in Iraq.  This item, used since 2003, called a HemCon® Bandage, is actually made from the shells of shrimp. However, so far during the product’s allergy testing no individuals had an allergic reaction, including the 8 patients with known shellfish allergies.  But as with any other shellfish/fish product, it’s important to be cautious when using such an item.

Photo from VegeUsa

                    Shellfish/Fish Alternatives and Eating on the Go

Unlike many other food allergies, there aren’t a huge amount of alternatives to shellfish/fish available.   Because of this it’s easier to look for Vegan options.  This is because Vegan foods will not contain actual animal products and/or by-products which make them a safe alternative and unlikely to suffer from cross-contamination.  VegeUSA suggests that the lack of seafood alternatives is due to the fact that it’s harder to replicate than most other types of meat.  However, they worked at the process and came up with Shrimp, Fish Fillets and Tuna Roll alternatives which are all vegan (aka shellfish/fish free).

With the exception of Seafood based restaurants, eating shellfish/fish free is overall a bit more manageable than other food allergies.  However, it’s always good to remember a few tips.  Avoid ordering French fries or other fried food from a place that also serves fried seafood due to cross-contamination of the frying oil.  Eating out at a Japanese restaurant may also be a no-no since it’s very common for multiple items to be cooked on the same surface (ex: going from cooking one customer’s fish to preparing your steak).  Eating With Food Allergies gives another great tip for eating out with any type of food allergy.  The site instructs that it’s helpful to either eat earlier or later than the normal crowds (i.e. before 6 PM or after 9 PM).   This strategy is essential in order to get more attentive service which can be vital in a server realizing that you suffer from an allergy and that your food needs are a necessity and not simply a preference.

While preparing to go out to eat, it’s always comforting to be able to research the available options on sites like Project Allergy in order to find out what the policies are at your favorite restaurants and hotels.  However, if you’re out and about there are some great casual restaurants to visit.  Macaroni Grill, On the Border, Famous Dave’s, Chili’s and Ruby Tuesday’s all offer online lists that cover each of their foods and what major allergens they may contain.  If you’re looking more for fast-food and/or delivery, Domino’s Pizza, Wendy’s and Boston Market all have similar informational sheets.  With many of these restaurants there are often mostly non-shellfish/fish options and at several places the only seafood item is Caesar Salad Dressing which is often sealed in packets that do not come in contact with other food items.

Photo from VegeUSA

                  Delicious Shellfish/Fish Free recipes to try at home

Vegan Shrimp Scampi from VegeUSA

Anchovy-Free Caesar Salad Dressing from Jewishfood-list

How do you or your family members deal with being Shellfish/Fish Free?  Please share your story.