Tag Archives: vegan

Customer Spotlight: Chive Kitchen

Each month we will feature Central customers to showcase their business and provide tips and ideas for any of you in the restaurant industry! This month’s article features Chive Kitchen.


 

Chive Kitchen11329967_837928002940232_5600255314148383062_n

A brand new restaurant located in Farmington Hills, Michigan, the Chive Kitchen is owned by self-proclaimed “foodie” Suzy Silvestre. Developed from a love of good food, Chive Kitchen is a vegan and vegetarian restaurant that focuses on quality, composed dishes, where it is a priority to source all products as local and as fresh as possible. Silvestre has held soft openings of the restaurant over the past month to test dishes with the public and adjust to the learning curve that accompanies opening a new restaurant. Once fully opened, the restaurant will serve breakfast, lunch, dinner and Sunday brunch. It will also have a bar area.

Inspiration

Silvestre expresses the difficulties of being a vegan/ vegetarian and wanting to dine out in Farmington, noting that “options in the area were limited.” Her solution was to open a restaurant of her own, boasting non-traditional vegan and vegetarian dishes. Silvestre has experience cooking creative vegan dishes and decided it was time to branch out from her corporate job in marketing and leverage her experience and love of the industry. Now specializing in high quality, comfort food, Chive Kitchen wants to appeal to the general population of “foodies” – not just the vegan / vegetarian market. Silvestre says “we want meat lovers, vegans and everyone in between to walk away loving our dishes.”

 

Delicious Vegan/ Vegetarian Dishes

Vegan House Italian Sausage Sandwich with Pepperoni Essence Aioli Grilled Peppers and Onions with a Basil Pesto

Vegan House Italian Sausage Sandwich with Pepperoni Essence Aioli Grilled Peppers and Onions with a Basil Pesto

The focus of Chive Kitchen is to create dishes that have a unique appeal – dishes that break the stereotype of “boring vegan or vegetarian food” and offer a melting pot of flavors to the menu. Silvestre notes that many recipes on the menu are creations from her home kitchen, but she also “relishes in the fun of creating new and innovative dishes with [their] trained kitchen manager to bring a fresh take on vegan fare.” Flavor profiles for the restaurant range from Portuguese and Western European influences to California Mexican and local Michigan favorites, such as the Coney dog. Among several spins on traditional foods, one of the most unique dishes that has been crafted is tofu chicharrón soft tacos with house made mole sauce. Silvestre taste tested the dish with her staff who are not vegans and noted that the reviews were amazing!

 

Experience with Central

Silvestre utilized Central’s friendly and knowledgeable product consultants to order tables and chairs for Chive Kitchen. Silvestre tells us, “I was extremely satisfied with the process of ordering, the delivery time and the quality of our tables and chairs. Once the tables and chairs were set up in our space, it felt like everything had finally come together.”

Chive Kitchen

If you also are looking for tables and chairs, see our selection here!

Love of the Industry

When asked what her favorite part is of owning Chive Kitchen, Silvestre states that she has enjoyed watching everything come together. After dreaming of opening her restaurant for years, it is finally coming to fruition. She explains, “Now, I have a staff that feels like family, a space that feels like home and I cannot express how much I enjoy watching customers coming in and sharing my love for good food.”

 

We have enjoyed following their story and encourage you to do the same on their Facebook page! And if you find yourself anywhere near Farmington Hills, Michigan, we highly recommend that you stop in to see Suzy and taste her delicious creations!

Eggs

Living with Dietary Restrictions: Eggs

When it comes to dietary allergies, eggs may be one of the most restrictive.   There are so many items that obviously contain eggs like most desserts/baked goods and noodles, but there are just as many, if not more foods that use eggs in a more veiled way.   Luckily, while eggs are harder to avoid than other food allergens, it does occur a little less often.  According to The Food Allergy & Anaphylaxis Network, “Egg allergy is estimated to affect approximately 1.5% of young children.”  The good news is that on average it is an allergy that can and will be outgrown.  However, it’s still smart to know what to avoid and the risks that an egg allergy presents.

EggsHow do egg allergies develop and can they be prevented?

Like most allergies, egg allergies are the body’s immune system attacking an element that it thinks is invading, in this case the egg protein.  According to the Mayo Clinic these attacks can manifest in symptoms including: Skin inflammation (most common), asthma, nasal inflammation, stomach issues and in severe cases anaphylaxis.  The reason for this allergy can range from a family history of the allergy and most often the immaturity of the digestive system, which is why the allergy shows up in children, but can be outgrown.  The Mayo Clinic continues to say those that suffer from this particular allergy are also more likely to suffer from other health problems as well.  These problems include other food allergies, hay fever, atopic dermatitis and allergic asthma.

As said before, many children do outgrow the allergy as their digestive system develops.  Kids Health says that an, “Egg allergy usually first appears when kids are very young, and most kids outgrow it by the time they’re 5 years old.”  However, it’s important to know that this is not always the case.   Allergic Child reported on a recent research study done on this topic at Johns Hopkins Children’s Center.   According to the study, “In what are believed to be the largest studies to date of children with milk and egg allergies, researchers followed more than 800 patients with milk allergy and nearly 900 with egg allergy over 13 years, finding that, contrary to popular belief, most of these allergies persist well into the school years and beyond.”

There has also been work done to help to actually prevent the allergy from appearing in the first place.  The study presented in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, suggested introducing eggs to a baby’s diet between the ages of four to six months.  While it’s not conclusive whether or not it actually prevents the allergy, it has been found that it at least does not increase its development.

What should be avoided?

With every food allergy, it’s essential to be aware of what a dish or product contains by reading labels and asking questions.  With eggs it’s also imperative to know the names of items that are egg related yet are not just simply called eggs.  The Mayo Clinic list these terms as the following: Albumin, Globulin, Lecithin, Livetin, Lysozyme, Simplesse, Vitellin, and words starting with “ova” or “ovo,” such as ovalbumin or ovoglobulin.  It’s also a good rule of thumb to avoid certain foods in general, unless they are specifically noted as not containing eggs.  Some of these items are anything made with a mix or batter, mayonnaise and items that include this ingredient, marshmallows, salad dressings and most baked goods and pastries.   It’s also wise to avoid drinks like beer, lattes and cappuccinos that use eggs in foaming agents, anything glazed and even many shampoos which use egg proteins for strengthening.  A final item that might not be as obvious is the vaccine for the flu.  The reason behind this according to the Center for Disease Control is that the vaccines are grown on egg embryos, which means they’ve been mixed with proteins from the egg itself.  However, with this item it’s important to talk with your health service provider before making a decision as they will be able to tell you if your allergy is or isn’t severe enough to cause a reaction to the small amount of protein.

Egg alternatives and eating on the go

While there are some specific alternatives to cooking with eggs like Egg Replacer by Ener-G, there are also many items that you may currently have in your house that can be used in place of eggs as well.  PETA provides many detailed options on how and what to use to substitute for egg use.  Similarly, you can try these great options compiled by Calorie Lab:

1 gelatin packet, 2 tbsp. warm water
1 tsp. baking powder, 1 tbsp. vinegar, 1 tbsp. liquid (such as water)
1 tsp. baking powder, 1 1/2 tbsp. oil, 1 1/2 tbsp. water
1 tsp. yeast, 1/4 cup warm water
1/2 of a medium-sized mashed banana
1 tbsp. ground flaxseed and 3 tbsp. warm water
1/4 cup applesauce
1 tsp. xanthan gum
In place of an egg wash, use melted margarine.
*Note:  It is important to know that these alternatives may not turn out well when a recipe calls for more than three eggs though.

When eating out with food allergies of any kind, Eating With Food Allergies advises that it’s helpful to either eat earlier or later than the normal crowds (i.e. before 6 PM or after 9 PM).   Doing so will help in allowing you to get more attentive service both at the table and in the kitchen.  Another handy item to remember when venturing out to eat is a Kids Health great cutout for your wallet that lists different foods and ingredients to avoid.  In addition to this cutout, checking sites like Special Gourmets can assist you in making decisions on the most appropriate place to eat.  The search engine bills itself as, “The largest global guide to restaurants, shops & hotels with options for gluten-free, dairy-free & other allergen-free diets.”   Not only is this guide helpful when looking for new places to try or when out of town, but it’s also handy when your or others you’re with are allergic to more than one item since it allows you to check off multiple items for your search.

While you’re out, the most reliable dining option would be to find a specifically Vegan venue.  These restaurants are always a great option for those with egg allergies because Vegans do not eat products that come from animals like eggs and the food is unlikely to suffer from cross-contamination as well.  Unfortunately, Vegan based dining options can be few and far between.  If you’re on the go and looking for an often occurring fast option, check out Taco Bell and Dairy Queen.  Taco Bell is a helpful option because most items do not contain egg products and since most items that do contain them are not necessarily created on-site, the risk for cross-contamination is lowered a bit.  As for Dairy Queen, there are some great options for you to get your ice cream fix.  However, even on their website they do warn of cross-contamination possibilities and encourage getting an ingredient listing from that specific restaurant for extra safety.   For a sit-down experience, On the Border provides a viable egg free option.  Most items there can be enjoyed normally since most of them don’t use eggs, but often require requesting the item without sauce and/or sour cream.

Delicious egg free recipes to try at home

Oven Baked Eggless Zucchini Fries from Eggless Cooking

Sweet Potato Biscuits from The Sensitive Pantry

How do you or your family members deal with being Egg Free?  Please share your story. 

Soda

Central’s Week in Brief: August 26, 2011

Every Friday Central brings you stories from the week that you might have missed, but that are definitely worth a look. We’ll feature food news covering everything from the weird to the wonderful in the world of restaurants, schools, the military and more.  It’s our way to help you go into the weekend with a little extra knowledge and maybe even a project or recipe to try out!

Soda1)      The U.S. Department of Agriculture said no to New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s proposal to ban the purchase of soda and other sugary drinks using food stamps.    According to CBS News, “The ban would have applied to any sweetened beverage that contains more than 10 calories per eight ounces.”  The proposal was turned down due to issues like  the time it may take to decide what would or wouldn’t qualify and that it might make those using the stamps feel stigmatized.

2)      Once known for his affinity for fatty foods like McDonald’s hamburgers, former president Bill Clinton has decided to go vegan.  USA Today reported that Clinton, “…is following this eating plan to improve his heart health.”  The former president has had surgery on his heart twice since 2004.  For more information on living the vegan lifestyle, check out our post on vegan and vegetarianism.

3)      Morton’s The Steakhouse took customer service to the next level using social media.  After Peter Shankman, a public relations professional, tweeted about wanting a steak dinner, a Morton’s staff member actually met him at the airport with a 24-ounce Porterhouse steak, Colossal Shrimp and potatoes.  Senior Vice President of Marketing and Communications at Morton’s, Roger Drake, told Smart Blog on Restaurants, “These things don’t happen unless it’s part of your culture, and that is really what Morton’s is all about: noticing little details, making it a memorable dining experience and wowing our guests.”  It also doesn’t hurt business that all of Morton’s and Shankman’s Twitter followers witnessed this act of kindness.

4)       A report done by the Union of Concerned Scientists has found that the amount of U.S. farmers markets has almost tripled within the last decade.  According to an article on Triple Pundit the markets went from, “2,863 in 2000 to 6,132 in 2010 and over 100,000 farmers are selling their products to customers directly.”   This boom of markets has help to boost local economies, but the report’s author, Jeffrey O’Hara, believes that if more government assistance  were provided to these types of farming practices instead of more industrial farms, it could generate “tens of thousands of new jobs.”

5)    With a new school year comes a new, healthier menu for 480 school districts being provided with food by the Sodexo company.  In order to help the fight against obesity and expand the tastes of students, Sodexo will now offer items like Mediterranean Lentil Soup and Tropical Vegetable Tofu.  According to a press release, “Sodexo’s team of culinary experts, including chefs at school districts nationwide, developed recipes that entice students and meet USDA’s National School Lunch Program guidelines.”  

If you’d like to try out a version of the Mediterranean Lentil Soup, check out this version from Epicurious.

Living with Dietary Restrictions: Shellfish and Fish

Shellfish and fish allergies are two of the most prevalent of the top food allergies.   These food items account for over half of all food allergies in the United States.  According to AllergicChild.com, “Approximately 12 million Americans suffer from food allergy, with 6.9 million allergic to fish and/or shellfish.”  However unlike many other food allergens, overall shellfish and fish are easier to stay away from  since with the exception of some food, vitamin and cosmetic items, their inclusion in most recipes is fairly obvious.

Photo from 1.bp.blogspot.com

       What’s the difference between shellfish and fish allergies?

Shellfish are overall pretty basic as they are divided into two different groups, mollusks and crustaceans.  Crustaceans include items like crabs, lobster, crayfish, shrimp and prawn, while mollusks include sub-categories such as Bivalves (clams, mussels, oysters and scallops), Gastropods (limpets, periwinkles, snails (escargot) and abalone) and Cephalopods (squid, cuttlefish and octopus).  The Mayo Clinic advises that “Some people are allergic to only one type of shellfish, but can eat others.”  This means it’s important to always ask a physician before eating any shellfish to be positive of which types must be avoided and which might be edible.  The Clinic continues by saying, “You’re at increased risk of developing a shellfish allergy if allergies of any type are common in your family.”

Fish allergies in contrast are much more varied compared to many other types of food allergies.  Since there are so many different types of fish, it’s hard to know exactly what to avoid.   Reactions can be caused by anything from scaly or bony fish to an entire family/species of fish.  Because the proteins in most fish are similar it’s a good idea to avoid all fish products to be safe and avoid an allergic reaction. 

Photo from talkallergy.com

                                     What should be avoided?

Even though it may seem pretty obvious to avoid items like crab, shrimp, lobster, cod, salmon and other types of shellfish and fish it’s also highly important to know about all of the items that contain these allergens.  While you may not realize it there are fish products lurking in many different types of sauces and food toppings.  AllergicChild.com lists many of these items and what they contain: Caesar salad dressing (anchovies), Worcestershire sauce (anchovies), Caponata (anchovies), fish sauce (shellfish/fish) and Patum Peperium or Gentelman’s Relish (anchovies).   The Food Allergy & Anaphylaxis Network also reminds to be on the lookout for ingredients in Barbecue sauce which often contains Worcestershire sauce.   It’s also important to be careful when eating foods like gumbo, paella and many different types of Asian cuisine which can often contain shellfish and/or fish.  

Some everyday products even use Menhaden (a type of fish) such as vitamins, soap, cosmetics and insect spray.  AllergicChild.com also warns of the use of a new type of bandage being used in Iraq.  This item, used since 2003, called a HemCon® Bandage, is actually made from the shells of shrimp. However, so far during the product’s allergy testing no individuals had an allergic reaction, including the 8 patients with known shellfish allergies.  But as with any other shellfish/fish product, it’s important to be cautious when using such an item.

Photo from VegeUsa

                    Shellfish/Fish Alternatives and Eating on the Go

Unlike many other food allergies, there aren’t a huge amount of alternatives to shellfish/fish available.   Because of this it’s easier to look for Vegan options.  This is because Vegan foods will not contain actual animal products and/or by-products which make them a safe alternative and unlikely to suffer from cross-contamination.  VegeUSA suggests that the lack of seafood alternatives is due to the fact that it’s harder to replicate than most other types of meat.  However, they worked at the process and came up with Shrimp, Fish Fillets and Tuna Roll alternatives which are all vegan (aka shellfish/fish free).

With the exception of Seafood based restaurants, eating shellfish/fish free is overall a bit more manageable than other food allergies.  However, it’s always good to remember a few tips.  Avoid ordering French fries or other fried food from a place that also serves fried seafood due to cross-contamination of the frying oil.  Eating out at a Japanese restaurant may also be a no-no since it’s very common for multiple items to be cooked on the same surface (ex: going from cooking one customer’s fish to preparing your steak).  Eating With Food Allergies gives another great tip for eating out with any type of food allergy.  The site instructs that it’s helpful to either eat earlier or later than the normal crowds (i.e. before 6 PM or after 9 PM).   This strategy is essential in order to get more attentive service which can be vital in a server realizing that you suffer from an allergy and that your food needs are a necessity and not simply a preference.

While preparing to go out to eat, it’s always comforting to be able to research the available options on sites like Project Allergy in order to find out what the policies are at your favorite restaurants and hotels.  However, if you’re out and about there are some great casual restaurants to visit.  Macaroni Grill, On the Border, Famous Dave’s, Chili’s and Ruby Tuesday’s all offer online lists that cover each of their foods and what major allergens they may contain.  If you’re looking more for fast-food and/or delivery, Domino’s Pizza, Wendy’s and Boston Market all have similar informational sheets.  With many of these restaurants there are often mostly non-shellfish/fish options and at several places the only seafood item is Caesar Salad Dressing which is often sealed in packets that do not come in contact with other food items.

Photo from VegeUSA

                  Delicious Shellfish/Fish Free recipes to try at home

Vegan Shrimp Scampi from VegeUSA

Anchovy-Free Caesar Salad Dressing from Jewishfood-list

How do you or your family members deal with being Shellfish/Fish Free?  Please share your story. 

Image from MorgueFile

Living with Dietary Restrictions: Vegetarian and Vegan

Remember back when you were younger and you parents demanded you eat your veggies?   This more than likely happened to all of us, but for some it was a message that really stuck.   Much of that growing population falls into the vegetarian (and on the stricter end, vegan) category.   A study done by Vegetarian Times found that the U.S. alone has, “7.3 million people follow a vegetarian-based diet” and “1 million, of those are vegans.”

Image from MorgueFileUnlike our previous Dietary Restriction blogs on being dairy and gluten free, going vegetarian or vegan is most often a choice rather than a dietary necessity and often the reasons behind it are different depending on the person.  Many make the decision based on the need or want to personally be healthier while at the same time it can be done for the health of the Environment.   There is also a high concern for animal welfare that brings many to the conclusion of eating sans meat and /or dairy.   For a vast majority one glimpse into the horrifying realities of factory farms and their treatment of animals used for food is more than enough to both turn their stomach and switch their outlook on consuming animal products of any type.   Taking these motivations and concerns into consideration, it is becoming increasingly common to see more options, creativity and innovation in the vegetarian and often vegan items available.  Often one taste of these delicious dishes (more often than not accompanied by increased education on the subject) is just enough to open new eyes to the vegetarian and vegan world.

What’s the difference between vegan and vegetarian?

While vegetarian and veganism may sound one in the same to many there is a strict difference between the two.  Often vegetarianism is seen as more of a food choice while veganism is seen as a lifestyle due to the whole-life philosophy behind the decision.

Vegetarian:  Vegetarians are the more lax of the two in terms of animal products that they are willing to consume.  According to VegetarianVegan.com, “Vegetarian is a blanket term used to describe a person who does not consume meat, poultry, fish, or seafood.”  This means that there are several sub-categories of vegetarianism, but the basic understanding is that a vegetarian does not consume any type of animal meat, yet does occasionally use milk, eggs and other animal products or by-products.   Sub-categories of vegetarianism include more strict eaters such as ovo-lacto-vegetarians (do not consume eggs/milk), ovo-vegetarian (do consume eggs, not milk), lacto-vegetarian (do consume milk, not eggs) and the strictest for which is vegan.

Vegan: While vegan is a form of vegetarianism, as stated previously, it is the strictest version.   Those considered vegan do not eat any animal products or by-products including everything from meat to dairy to even honey.   Many vegans are also against using animal products like wool and silk in daily life as well.                      

What products should be avoided?

Image from MorgueFileFor both choices it is important that all meat products including poultry and fish are avoided.  However, vegans take the restrictions just a bit further to avoid animal byproducts as well.  The most obvious of these byproducts are items like eggs and dairy (milk, cheese, ice cream, etc.).  However, there are also many common products that come from animals that we may not even normally be aware of.  Kidshealth.org gives the following examples: gelatin (made using meat byproducts), lanolin (made from wool), rennet (an enzyme found in the stomach of calves, young goats, and lambs that’s used in cheese-making), honey and beeswax (made by bees), silk (made by silkworms), shellac (the resinous secretion of the tiny lac insect) and cochineal (a red dye derived from the cochineal insect).

What are some alternatives?

Because animal products aren’t on the top allergen list, it can sometimes be difficult to know what does and doesn’t work.  One benefit to eating vegan is that oftentimes items that are dairy-free may also be vegan due to the lack of milk product used.  This also means that there are a ton of different lines of milk and cheese alternatives made from soy, rice, almonds and even hemp (Indy Vegans has a great list comparing each type to help in making your decision). However, there are many  other great food options as well.

Another great option are the Follow Your Heart products.  This line offers everything from eggless mayonnaise (called Vegenaise) to vegan cheese, sour cream and cream cheese which is all animal product free.  If you’re in the mood for something a little sweeter online stores like Chicago SoyDairy and Literally Divine have got great options for your sweet tooth.  Chicago SoyDairy specializes in items like marshmallows (even non-animal product Easter Peeps called Tweets) and ice cream.  Literally Divine offers a wide array of truffles and toffee that is all natural, organic and vegan.

Eating Vegan and Vegetarian on the Go

The nice thing about vegetarian and vegan eating is that while they may be few and far between one or two options are usually available at most restaurants, even if it means a veggie only salad with oil and vinegar dressing.  If that’s not necessarily your idea of a worthwhile restaurant tip, then Happy Cow may be just your ticket to finding some tasty, creative dining outside of your own home.  Happy Cow is a search engine that allows you to enter in where you’ll be dining and then provides you with different nearby options and the degree to which the food is vegetarian.  VegGuide.org is another similar site that allows users to give a description and rating of the restaurants vegan and vegetarian friendly options.

Just as in our previous dairy-free post, it’s extremely important to be aware of the possibility of cross-contamination if you are dedicated to eating vegetarian or living a vegan lifestyle.  Whether you’re out to eat at a chain restaurant or at a family pitch-in making sure that you know the ingredients included in a dish can truly help you maintain your dietary choices.  Indy Vegan instructs, “Being vegan means reading labels. I don’t care how much you hate it and how much time it takes, it’s just something you have to do. And if you don’t know, ask!”  And in situations like pitch-ins, it’s a great opportunity to introduce non-vegans/vegetarians to your dietary habits, but remember to do so in small doses as not everyone is apt to dive right in to the tofu salad, but may be more willing to try out a smaller dose of something like non-dairy cheese.

In the meantime, if you’re on the go and curious as to where it’s safe to eat, you can rest assured that there are options available.  One huge and ever changing option is the sandwich shop.  While it is important to make sure that bread is made without using animal products, this is often your best bet.  One national food chain that offers a great vegan/vegetarian array is Which Wich.  They have everything from a traditional veggie blend, to a hummus based sandwich all of which are served on bread that contains no animal ingredients.  If you’re in more of a sharing mood, Barcelona Tapas, a Spanish tapas chain has many great vegan options like grilled and marinated vegetables and even churro’s for dessert.  Even bigger chains like Chili’s have a few vegan options here or there.  While many of the foods are blatantly booked as vegan, items like fajitas and veggie quesadillas can be specially ordered to fit your needs.  In general many Indian and Middle Eastern restaurants also very easily fit into the vegan lifestyle since many dishes are already vegetarian due to religious reasons.  Items to try are samosas, hummus, falafel and Dal.

Delicious Vegan and Vegetarian recipes to try at home

Mac and Cheese Pizza from the Tolerant Vegan

Green Dream Soup from Indy Vegans

How do you or your family members deal with being Vegan and/or Vegetarian?  Please share your story. 

5 Healthy Alternatives to Your Holiday Cookie Recipes

Cookies; Image from MorgueFileWith the holiday season in full swing, sweets are virtually unavoidable.  While most people don’t go looking for the healthy stuff this time of year (or heaven’s forbid turn down a cookie), it is nice to know that if you’re about to start baking there are some nutritious alternatives to the old favorites and classic standbys.  There’s no need to skimp on flavor this holiday, but if you try these five recipes, your waistline will thank you come January.

Vegan Holiday Sugar Cookies provide a great base for decoration and (as seen in the blog post included with the recipe) are a big hit with both kids and adults.   These delicious treats will not only give you a chance to experiment with the wide world of vegan without going too far outside your comfort zone, but also give you a chance to try out some new alternative ingredients such as egg replacements and vegan cream cheese that could be incorporated into other recipes.

Healthy Brownie Cookies let you have a little fun with chocolate (because who doesn’t crave it?) without all that added guilt.  Everyone likes a good brownie and with these you’ll get a chance to stay on your diet because they are low-fat and incorporate fiber with added bran.

Chocolate Chunk Cookies are always a crowd favorite, but this recipe adds in a little something extra…tofu.  While this may seem totally unorthodox to the chocolate chip cookie purists, tofu is a great way to keep your heart healthy by lowering cholesterol.  As if that wasn’t enough reason to add tofu, the yummy chocolaty goodness of these cookies actually prevents you from even knowing it’s in there, which means all the benefits with the same great taste.

 Raspberry Thumbprint Cookies give you a way to control your portions without missing out.  These goodies can often be high in fat due to the large amounts of butter.  However, this take on the classic swaps out some of that badness that makes the cookies so moist for a fruity alternative.  By just mixing up some hot water, pureed apples and a small amount of butter the cookies maintain their texture and add in a little more of a daily food group.

If you’re really feeling the health kick this season, you may even want to try Nikki’s Healthy Cookie Recipe.  This one may be just a bit out of your normal comfort zone, but promises to be rich, hearty and “macaroon-eque.”  An extra bonus to the cookie is that it contains no butter, sugar or eggs and can also be made as a gluten-free option for those with allergies.